How to avoid the cruise ship pollution problem

How to Avoid the Cruise Ship Pollution Problem article In the past decade, more than 30 cruise ships have been banned from international waters.

The vessels that have left the port of Hamburg have not only contributed to a global marine pollution problem, they have also left the environment in the dark.

In Germany alone, the number of ships that have been cited for their hazardous and unsanitary conditions has reached an alarming level.

“The fact that this kind of pollution has been allowed to persist in international waters is a scandal,” said Greenpeace campaigner Peter Söderström.

“If the authorities really cared about our oceans and the planet, they would ban cruise ships.” Sögerströms comments were echoed by a report published by the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute in December.

In that report, the study said the European Commission has ignored international agreements banning cruise ships from docking in international waterways.

The report found that the Commission’s decision not to enforce international maritime laws and standards for marine safety was due to political pressure and that the issue had been ignored for a decade.

A year later, the commission has finally agreed to change its stance on cruise ships.

According to the commission, it will begin the process of changing the EU law, which currently allows cruise ships to dock in international harbours, on March 1.

The European Commission said that the change will help the environment and improve safety for passengers and crew.

“We are committed to creating a sustainable and environmentally sound economy,” said Jean-Claude Juncker, the Commission President, at a press conference.

The Commission’s proposal will apply to all ships of a size of up to 50 metric tons (100 metric tons) that have a gross tonnage exceeding 2 million tons, according to the draft version of the new law.

The ships will also be subject to a number of measures, including the requirement to report all their cargo, waste and other waste to the authorities.

Söagerströs hopes that the new proposal will finally make the cruise ships off the coast of Hamburg and other ports in Europe safe from cruise ship emissions.

“I hope the EU will finally do something about cruise ships,” she said.

“It is clear that this is not a problem that we can ignore.”

Greenpeace will be working with the Swedish Pirate Party and the Greenpeace International to fight the cruise industry’s agenda in Hamburg and in other ports around the world.

The Greenpeace International is a global environmental organisation dedicated to fighting the global pollution of the environment through peaceful, effective, and responsible action.

The organization fights against environmental destruction, and for a just and sustainable future.

Greenpeace International’s media contact is Laura Smith.

For more information about the Greenpeace campaign, please visit www.greenpeace.org.au/pollution.